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SO, HERE ARE 5 FABULOUS FACTS ABOUT FEVER.

I certainly can understand why. Kids can do crazy things when they get fevers. They don’t sleep well, eat poorly, and behave strangely. Some children can even have seizures due to a quick spike in body temperature. So it isn’t surprising that beginning as early as the pre-natal consultation, parents ask questions about what to do when their child gets a fever.

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Some of these statements may be exactly opposite what our mothers have said about fever. The goal of this post is not to discredit grandma, but to decrease fever phobia and treat fever correctly. And with the right information, maybe the next time our pink-cheeked kiddos come to us with warm foreheads, we might not be so eager to jump to our medicine cabinets.

Please note: The following facts are NOT true for infants under the age of 3 months. Please talk to your pediatrician about newborns with fever. In addition, the following advice will not assist with cabin fever, baseball fever, yellow fever, boogie fever, or Husker fever. All, but one, of which I am suffering from right now.

With very specific exceptions, kids do not have to maintain a “normal” temperature during times of illness. Fever is a normal, healthy way for the body to fight common infections. Bacteria and viruses that attack our bodies love normal body temperature, but cannot successfully replicate in hotter conditions. Fever, therefore, reflects a robust immune system’s defense against these pathogenic attackers. The bacteria and viruses are the enemy, not the fever they cause.

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So remember: fever is a symptom of illness, not a disease. Seeing a high number on the thermometer means your child’s body is doing its job to fight an infection.

Different kids shows different behavior.Many kids running and playing with high fevers. Where as other children who look sluggish and sad with a reasonably mild fever. Every kiddo reacts to a fever differently. So regardless of the actual numerical value, look for signs of serious illness in your child. Observe his level of discomfort, level of activity, and ability to maintain adequate hydration. If you are concerned, call your kids doctor to discuss the next steps.

Fevers help the body fight infection. Treating a fever is only necessary when you think your child is uncomfortable. The goal of administering antipyretic (anti-fever) medications is NOT to get a high temperature back to “normal.” They are simply medications to make your child feel better.

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Fevers can make kids feel pretty lousy. A child with a fever can have altered sleep, unusual behavior, and poor oral intake. If these symptoms are upsetting to your child, please give a fever reducing medication. Treating fever does provide comfort, and may decrease the risk of dehydration.

Infants

An unexplained fever is greater cause for concern in infants and in children than in adults. Call your baby’s doctor if your child is:

Younger than age 3 months and has a rectal temperature of 100.4 F (38 C) or higher.
Between ages 3 and 6 months and has a rectal temperature up to 102 F (38.9 C) and seems unusually irritable, lethargic or uncomfortable or has a temperature higher than 102 F (38.9 C).
Between ages 6 and 24 months and has a rectal temperature higher than 102 F (38.9 C) that lasts longer than one day but shows no other symptoms. If your child also has other signs and symptoms, such as a cold, cough or diarrhea, you might call your child’s doctor sooner based on severity.

Children

Whats are the alarming conditions for parents and how they can know that their child has a fever.
There’s probably no cause for alarm if your child has a fever but is responsive — making eye contact with you and responding to your facial expressions and to your voice — and is drinking fluids and playing. So these things could be simple alarm for parents.

Need to Call your child’s doctor if your child:

Is listless or irritable, vomits repeatedly, has a severe headache or stomachache, or has any other symptoms causing significant discomfort.
Has a fever after being left in a hot car. Seek medical care immediately.
Has a fever that lasts longer than three days.
Appears listless and has poor eye contact with you.
Ask your child’s doctor for guidance in special circumstances, such as a child with immune system problems or with a pre-existing illness.

Adults

Call your doctor if your temperature is 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. Seek immediate medical attention if any of these signs or symptoms accompanies a fever:

Severe headache
Unusual skin rash, especially if the rash rapidly worsens
Unusual sensitivity to bright light
Stiff neck and pain when you bend your head forward
Mental confusion
Persistent vomiting
Difficulty breathing or chest pain
Abdominal pain or pain when urinating
Convulsions or seizures

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